The overall environment and habitat is of a few different kinds, we see that the woods is surrounded by farm field, and then cornered by a road and the nature preserve’s border. The woods itself is almost like a funnel, there are high hills on both sides of a low lying area that runs water very slowly for a good portion of spring and summer and slowly dries into the middle of fall. There is a private residence in almost the southeast corner, and there are some kept trails into the woods from there.

Within the area we can see a roadside community which mostly consists of grasses and what most would consider weeds, as we move north from the roadside we can see a stereotypical upland wooded area which will seemingly last until we reach the field at the north most edge. This description is a little deceiving, there is a low lying area within the woods that runs with water as previously stated, it is regular for this water to be at least a foot and a half deep or more. In this area we see a wetland/stream bank habitat that stretches from the southwest point to almost the central portion of the woods. The thick wooded canopy areas lie along each edge of the woods, with sections of young successional forest due to ash trees being removed from the canopy spotted throughout the middle. Some areas of the northeast section is dominated by thickets and shrub layers. Lastly along the north edge of the woods we see a slight ground cover border between the woods and farm field. Without further ado we will dive into what you can find in these different areas!

A spot in the woods where an ash tree has died and the light that makes it through the canopy has inspired a lot of undergrowth.
One roadside view.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Apiaceae (carrot family)
Cryptotaenia canadensis (L.) DC. Honewort. Native forb usually less than 2 feet tall. CC=3. Individuals found in scattered patches usually in semi-wet environments. Not very common.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Apiaceae (carrot family)
Osmorhiza longistylis (Torr.) DC. Smooth sweet cicely. Native forb, usually less than 2 feet tall. CC=4. A few clusters of individuals found on the southern side of the woods in the understory. Somewhat common.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Apiaceae (carrot family)
Sanicula canadensis L. Short styled snakeroot. Native forb. Usually 2-3 feet tall. CC=3. Plenty of individuals growing in shaded understory areas with tall deciduous canopies especially common in the south parts of the woods. Common.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Apocynaceae (dogbanes family)
Apocynum cannabinum L. Indian hemp. Native forb usually 2-3 feet tall. CC=1. Few individuals growing alongside the road ditch on the south side of the woods. Not very common. As the name suggests Native Americans used the fibrous stems to make cordage which they then used for a variety of things.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Asteraceae (aster family)
Bellis perennis L. Common daisy. Non-native forb. A few individual small herbaceous daisies, found along the north edge along the feild line. Not very common.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Asteraceae (aster family)
Bidens frondosa L. Devil’s beggar’s-tick. Native forb. CC=2. Found plenty of individuals along the southwest edge of the woods, picked these seeds for days off of clothes. Somewhat common. Other than the annoying seeds, this plant’s root is noticed for treating ailments including inflammation and irritations of the skin.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Asteraceae (aster family)
Cichorium intybus L. Chicory. Non-native forb usually less than 2 and a half feet tall. Remnants of the bloom in the ditch and edge of the woods on the south side. Somewhat common during bloom.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Asteraceae (aster family)
Cirsium altissimum (L.) Hill. Tall thistle. Native prarie forb. CC=4. Found along the northern edge of the woods growing almost in the farm field, only a few individuals and none found within the canopy area. Not very common.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Asteraceae (aster family)
Euthamia graminifolia (L.) Nutt. Flat-topped goldenrod. Native forb usually 3-4 feet tall and as the name suggests the flowers are in a flat umbel pattern. CC=2. A few individuals in the road ditch along the south side of the woods. Not very common.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Asteraceae (aster family)
Solidago canadensis L. Canada goldenrod. Native forb, can get to be 4-5 feet tall. CC=1. Very common on the edges of the woods both south and north side, save for the southwest corner.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Asteraceae (aster family)
Solidago flexicaulis L. Broad-leaved goldenrod. Native forb usually less than 2 feet tall. CC=5. A few individuals found in the forest understory near the edge of the woods, all found in the northeastern corner. Not common.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Asteraceae (aster family)
Symphyotrichum cordifolium L. Common blue wood aster. Native forb usually about 2 feet tall. CC=4. Plenty of individuals found in an open area in the south part of the woods by the road ditch, also scattered individuals along the edges. Somewhat common. Uses for this plant include an aromatic nervine and as most other things a treatment of rheumatism.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Asteraceae (aster family)
Symphyotrichum lateriflorum (L.) Britton. Calico aster. Native forb usually less that 2 feet tall. CC=2. Found a few individuals along the eastern edge of the woods but not many. Not very common.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Asteraceae (aster family)
Xanthium strumarium L. Common cocklebur. Non-native forb. Usually taller around 2-3 feet and grow in disturbed areas. This individual was found along the forest’s edge on the north side, likely brought in by deer and the seed was tilled under in cultivation. Not very common. One of the more common uses of the plant is as a sedative and diuretic, not to mention anti fungal and anti bacterial. An interesting process someone has used was to use them as a case for a small gps tracker, allowing it to stick to an animal and track their movements until the seed casing finally falls apart or falls off.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Balsaminaceae (balsam family)
Impatiens capensis Meerb. Spotted touch-me-not. Native forb, can get to be quite shrubby up to 6 feet tall. CC=2. Common in the southeast side of the woods. Many people (including one of my old bosses) claim that the stem and leaf of this plant if smashed between your fingers produces a resin that you can then use to treat nettle rashes, mosquito bites, ring worm, and poison ivy rashes. I have tried it on a bug bite before and it did seem to help? Could’ve been a placebo.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Boraginaceae (stickseed family)
Hackelia virginiana (L.) I. M. Johnst. Virginia stickseed. Native forb, usually 2-3 feet tall. CC=2. Found few individuals in the northwest rounded edge of the woods. Not very common. In ancient medicines the crushed root was often mixed with bear oil and used to treat cancerous masses and improve memory. A non-medicinal use was for love potions or charms.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Campanulaceae (bellflower family)
Lobelia cardinalis L. Cardinal-flower. Native forb, usually less than 1 foot tall. CC=5. Found along the northern edge of the woods in the wood line. Native Americans used the root tea from this plant to treat a myriad of issues including worms and typhoid, some people use it now to make “love potions”.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Caprifoliaceae (honeysuckle family)
Viburnum prunifolium L. Blackhaw. Native shrub around 5-10 feet tall. CC=4. A few individuals in a shadier area between the prickly-ash thickets. Not very common. Blackhaw has been used through the ages as a medicine to treat diarrhea, asthma, and even spasms including menstrual cramps.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Celastraceae (staff vine and bittersweet family)
Euonymus americanus L. American strawberry bush. Native shrub, usually around 10 feet tall, this individual was small. CC=6. A small group of two to three individuals within 10 feet of each other on the southern side of the woods on a higher area away from the seasonal flood zone. Not very common. Not only do wildlife eat the fruits produced but people use them for issues regarding urinary pains and stomach issues such as pain or vomiting blood.

American strawberry bush

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Cyperaceae (sedge family)
Carex lacustris Willd. Lake sedge. Native sedge grass growing in water or swampy areas and grows usually 2-3 feet tall. CC=5. Grows heavily in the non-shaded areas of the seasonally flooded areas. Common. Sedges create ample amounts of habitat for wildlife, both in the wet season and dry times of the year.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Fabaceae (legume family)
Desmodium paniculatum (L.) DC. Showy tick-trefoil. Native forb usually 2-3 feet tall. CC=3. Found 2 individuals in the eastern edge of the woods, identified by their pod-like Velcro seeds. Not very common. This forb also fixes nitrogen like a legume, therefor it has been added to certain cover crop mixes and even attracts pollinators.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Fagaceae (beeches)
Fagus grandifolia Ehrh. American beech. Medium to large sized native tree. CC=7. Few individuals within the area, this individual resting on the edge of a hole in the canopy in a slightly seasonal wet area. Not very common. These trees are most often used as landscape, however they are the favorite tree of our most abundant squirrel population, that’s right the Southern Flying Squirrel absolutely loves this tree.

American beech.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Fagaceae (oaks)
Quercas bicolor Willd. Swamp white oak. Native large tree. CC=7. Swamp white oaks are not as common as most of the trees such as the maples however there are good amounts of these trees within the area.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Fagaceae (oaks)
Quercas rubra L. Red oak. Native large tree. CC=6. Red oaks are slightly common being found along the side of the higher topographic ridges to the north and south.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Grossulariaceae (currants and gooseberries)
Ribes cynosbati L. Dogberry. Shrub based on canes. CC=3. Two to three individuals that look rather new and alongside disturbed trail areas, mostly on the eastern edge of the woods. Somewhat common.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Juglandaceae (walnuts)
Juglans nigra L. Black walnut. Native large tree. CC=5. Along the higher northern topography along the forest edge against the field the black walnuts are numerous, and only yield to the more wet adapted species as the field cuts closer to the road and tapers off the woods to the west. Common.

Black walnut.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Liliaceae (lily family)
Maianthemum stellatum (L.) Link. Starry false Solomon’s seal. Native forb that grows on the forest floor can be 2-3 feet or taller. CC=7. A few individuals found as small plants in the south central parts of the woods. Not very common.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Liliaceae (lily family)
Polygonatum pubescens (Willd.) Pursh. Downy Solomon’s seal. Native understory forb. CC=5. A few individuals in clusters found within the snakeroot within the southeast/south central areas of the woods. Somewhat common.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Oleaceae (olives)
Fraxinus americana L. White ash. Usually a large native tree, currently saplings. CC=6. Most of the ash trees have been wiped from the forest, however there are a few of these and other ashes growing in the understory, avoiding the seasonally flooded areas. Somewhat common.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Oleaceae (olives)
Fraxinus nigra Marshall. Black ash. Usually a large native tree, currently saplings. CC=7. Most of the ash trees have been wiped from the forest, however there are a few of this species and other ashes growing in the understory, avoiding the seasonally flooded areas. Somewhat common. The wood of this tree has a special quality that allows it to be bent permanently, and thanks to how much lighter it is than white ash it is often used for things like snowshoes, barrel hoops, and canoe ribs.

Black Ash.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Papaveraceae (poppy family)
Sanguinaria canadensis L. Bloodroot. Native forb usually less than a foot tall. CC=5. Few individuals left this late but found a few decrepit representatives, usually in spring very common throughout the woods. The root and flower are studied for effects regarding the ability to strengthen heart contractions and the breaking up of phlegm and mucus like mucinex.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Platanaceae (plane trees)
Platanus occidentalis L. American sycamore. Native large tree. CC=7. Sycamores are slightly uncommon with only 4-5 individuals within the area and most of these trees are in areas close to vernal pools or within reach of the seasonal flooding area.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Polygonaceae (knotweed family)
Fallopia scandens L. Climbing false buckwheat. Native forb that climbs up taller trees or shrubby plants, usually getting around 16 feet tall. CC=2. Large mass of individual(s?) in the northern tree line climbing a raspberry bush and elm tree. Only group found. Not common. This vine is edible but with a trick, it has the same compounds are rhubarb leaves so therefor eating it raw will make you sick, in some unsubstantiated cases it has even caused some people to develop photosensitivity after consumption of any part of the plant.

Climbing false buckwheat.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Rubiaceae (bedstraw family)
Galium concinnum Torr. & A. Gray. Shining bedstraw. Native forb with whorled leaves and usually less than 2 feet tall. CC=5. Individuals found throughout the dryer parts of the woods but none in large clusters or groups. Common.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Rutaceae (citrus family)
Zanthoxylum americanum Mill. Prickly-ash. Shrub that forms thickets, up to 10 feet tall. CC=3. Two large clusters in the northeast corner of the woods, likely around 200 square feet put together. Common. This shrub’s bark and berry are used to make tonics and teas that people drink hoping to reduce issues with blood circulation and any kind of aching such as ulcers, toothaches, or regular swelling.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Sapindaceae (soapberry family)
Acer rubrum L. Red maple. Native upright tree. CC=2. There are a few red maples but no impressive stands, usually grow in small groups in areas where ash trees have fell and produced holes within the canopy, a few tall individuals here or there. Somewhat common.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Sapindaceae (soapberry family). Aesculus glabra Willd. Ohio buckeye. Native medium sized tree. CC=6. Ohio buckeyes are possibly harder to find than the sycamore trees, as they’re are along one of the higher topography areas, in a small group off to one of the corners of the property. Not very common. This plant has different uses when it comes to the Native Americans and today, first the tribesmen would use it as a salve or the same way we would use neosporin, whereas some people today believe that it can relieve rheumatism or arthritis pains.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Ulmaceae (elm family)
Celtis occidentalis L. Hackberry. Medium sized native tree. CC=4. A cluster of individuals between walnut trees along the western edge, some in the understory around this area. Common. This regular face has multiple uses, including erosion control and windbreak plantings, while ancient and some modern people have learned how to use it as a concoction that could possibly induce abortion, regulate cycles, and even treat certain venereal diseases.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Urticaceae (nettle family)
Laportea canadensis (L.) Wedd. Wood-nettle. Native forb usually less than 2 feet tall. CC=5. Two large groups of individuals along the eastern edge of the woods. Somewhat common. Throughout the years people have used nettles to treat arthritis, they claim that stinging areas affected provides pain relief as the immune system reacts.

Wood-nettle.

Magnoliophyta (angiosperms)
Vitaceae (flowering grape family)
Vitis riparia Michx. Riverbank grape. Native climbing vine. CC=3. Smaller individuals grow around the house and on small shrubs, with a few larger individuals in the northeast corner climbing larger trees with the vines getting close to 3-4 inches in diameter. Common. Fruits from this plant are commonly eaten by a myriad of the local fauna, while the most interesting ecosystem use is that cardinals and a few other species use the longer strips of bark in the central layer of their nests.

Riverbank grape.

Riverbank grape CC=3, black ash CC=7, black walnut CC=5, wood-nettle CC=5, American strawberry bush CC=6, lake sedge CC=5, American beech CC=7, swamp white oak CC=7, red oak CC=6, starry false Solomon’s seal CC=7, downy Solomon’s seal CC=5, white ash CC=6, bloodroot CC=5, climbing false buckwheat CC=2, shiny bedstraw CC=5, prickly ash CC=3, ohio buckeye CC=6, red maple CC=2, spotted touch me nots CC=3, Dogberry CC=2.

This calculates out to 20.6 as the FQAI value for the site, this is depending on the selection you take from however I believe this is somewhat representative. Now onto our highs and lows! Followed by known spotted invasives.

Black ash CC=7. It’s wood can be permanently bent very easily, making this perfect for things like woven chair seats and basketry splints.
American sycamore CC=7. The trees have little hidden abilities, including the inner bark being used as a measles treatment, however these trees have a higher value due to the fact that they support high amounts of differing taxa, whether directly through nut production or indirectly through the aphids they attract.
American beech CC=7, this tree supports niche taxa, and another interesting fact is that the wood is used for railroad ties and more important barrels for beer aging!
A swamp white oak or two CC=7. These guys have a similarity with their cousins in that they were a decent wood to build boats with!
Flat topped goldenrod CC=2, it is a lance leafed goldenrod and is best identified by its almost umbel structure, in a separate genus as most goldenrods.
Canada goldenrod CC=1, these guys are best identified with the pollen produced along a spear and the timing in which it blooms. These plants are mostly blamed for the allergies that giant ragweed causes. They have such a low CC because they are an extremely aggressive native and often acclimate to most prairie areas making them almost like an invasive.
Hackberry, CC=4, this is the branches of a hackberry tree that have been attacked by the hackberry mite, it produces these witches broom structures.
Calico aster, CC=2, this little fella is strange as the color of the inflorescence change from yellow to purple, often times at a gradient therefore you will likely see a miked coloring pattern.

Now that are highs and lows are done, we have to deal with the dreaded invasives (boo hiss)…

Common cocklebur is identifiable by its slightly pink stems and triangulate leaves, its fruit is the hooked bur. These burs are the seeds and are hooked in order for the seeds to stick to an animal and be carried off as a hitchhiker.
The vine on the bottom is winter creeper, it is a dark green vegetation that ground covers and then has to climbs trees in order to reproduce. These are usually spread by bird droppings.
Amur honeysuckle, the best identifier is experience, however they are a shrub with opposite usually lighter green leaves and produce red berries come early to late fall. These guys were planted in ohio as wildlife habitat by ODNR back in the day, and then they became extremely prolific.
Multiflora rose, a good identifier is the feathery stipple at the base of the leaves. It originated in Eastern Asia and was introduced to the USA as rootstock for other ornamental roses.

Sources:

https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=loca2

https://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/indian-hemp-dogbane

https://www.mountsinai.org/health-library/herb/stinging-nettle

https://www.rxlist.com/black_haw/supplements.htm#Overview

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-73/northern-prickly-ash

https://www.columbusrecoverycenter.com/blog/things-you-might-not-know-about-buckeyes-and-opioids/#elementor-toc__heading-anchor-5

https://plants.usda.gov/DocumentLibrary/plantguide/pdf/pg_frni.pdf

http://www.naturalmedicinalherbs.net/herbs/a/aster-cordifolius=common-blue-wood-aster.php

https://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/grasses/plants/lake_sedge.html

https://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/field-guide/riverbank-grape

https://eec.ky.gov/Natural-Resources/Forestry/ky-champion-trees/Documents/Hackberry%20common.pdf

https://www.inaturalist.org/guide_taxa/825205

https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Polygonum+dumetorum

https://www.wildflower.org/expert/show.php?id=464

Cocklebur

https://www.healthbenefitstimes.com/strawberry-bush/amp/

https://gobotany.nativeplanttrust.org/species/hackelia/virginiana/

https://www.verywellhealth.com/bloodroot-4175168

https://pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Desmodium+paniculatum

https://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/TreeDetail.cfm?ItemID=789

http://insight.cumbria.ac.uk/id/eprint/624/

https://www.arborday.org/trees/treeguide/TreeDetail.cfm?ItemID=789

https://eec.ky.gov/Natural-Resources/Forestry/ky-champion-trees/Documents/Oak%20swamp%20white.pdf

https://kingcounty.gov/services/environment/animals-and-plants/noxious-weeds/weed-identification/multiflora-rose.aspx

https://ohiodnr.gov/discover-and-learn/plants-trees/broad-leaf-trees/amur-honeysuckle-lonicera-maackii

https://www.invasive.org/alien/pubs/midatlantic/eufo.htm