Fruiting Plants

Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), Apocynceae. The fruit of this plant can be identified as a schizocarp. Milkweed flowers consist of five petals, with fused filaments and styles and a five part corona (with 5 stamens, as well). The flowers are radially symmetrical and have a superior (hypogynous) ovary with no hypanthium. Its inflorescence is an umbel.  I saw this plant at Battelle Darby Creek Metro Park near the wetland area.

Flowering dogwood (Cornus florida), Cornaceae. Its fruit is characterized as a berry; flowers are radially symmetrical; dogwoods have 4 large petals that are actually bracts surrounding 20 smaller flowers. Its inflorescence is a “head”; Dogwoods have 4 stamens and 4 sepals and an epigynous ovary. I found this plant on the edge of the forest near Battelle Darby Metro Park.

Swamp white oak (Quercus bicolor), Fagaceae. This fruit is a nut, more commonly known as an acorn. Swamp white oaks have leaves that are lobed with alternate veination. I saw this tree on the edge of a prairie habitat near Battelle Darby Metro Park.

Virgin’s bower (Clematis virginiana),  Ranunculaceae . The fruit of this plant is named an achene. Flowers have 4 petals, 4-5 sepals, and numerous stamens. Bower flowers are radially symmetrical with a panicle inflorescence and a hypogynous ovary. I found this plant at Cedar Bog Nature Preserve.

Spicebush (Lindera benzoin), Lauraceae. This fruit is called a drupe. Spicebush flowers have 6 sepals, 9 stamens and an epigynous ovary. Flowers are radially symmetrical with clustered, opposite inflorescences on its twigs. I saw this plant at Cedar Bog Nature Preserve.

Jack-in-the-pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum), Araceae. It has a multiple fruit. The flower has a spike inflorescence and a hypogynous ovary. It doesn’t have petals or sepals (flowers aren’t very visible with naked eye) but is characterized as having several stamens. I found this plant at Cedar Bog Nature Preserve (sorry for the blurry photo!).

Flowering Plants

 

Heath aster (Symphyotrichum ericoides), Asteraceae. It is radially symmetrical  with a capitulum inflorescence. It has an epigynous ovary, and its flower parts are fused together. The aster has modified sepals called a pappus. I found this flower at Battelle Darby Metro Park.

Red clover (Trifolium pratense), Fabaceae. It has five petals and sepals, respectively, that are fused into a tube, and 10 stamens are present. Red clovers are bilaterally symmetrical, and they have a perigynous ovary; inflorescence is a head. I found this specimen at Battelle Darby Metro Park.

Spotted touch-me-not (Impatiens capensis), Balsaminaceae. It has 5 petals and sepals that are fused together and 5 stamens. The plant is bilaterally symmetrical; the ovary is hypogynous and the inflorescence is a cluster of 1-3 flowers. I found this plant at Cedar Bog Nature Preserve.

Morning glory (genus Ipomea), Convolvulaceae. Sepals and petals are fused, and 5 stamens are present. The flower is radially symmetrical and the ovary is hypogynous; the inflorescence is characterized as a  dichasium. I found this plant in a prairie habitat near Battelle Darby Metro Park.

Cowbane (Cicuta virosa), Apiaceae. The flower inflorescence is an umbel; it has five petals and sepals that are separate from one another. Cowbane is radially symmetrical, and it has an epigynous ovary. I found this specimen at Cedar Bog Nature Preserve.

Goldenrod (Solidago rigida), Asteraceae. Flowers are radially symmetrical, and the inflorescence is a capitulum. It has an epigynous ovary with flower parts fused together. I found this plant at Battelle Darby Metro Park.