Flower 1: Field thistle

Genus + species: Cirsium discolor

Family: Asteraceae

This flower is zygomorphic with fused petals. There are 5 fused stamen, 5 sepals, and 5 petals.  The insertion of flower parts is epigynous, and the gynoecium type is unicarpellate. The inflorescence type is a capitulum.

This plant was found in a wet meadow at Battelle-Darby Creek Metro Park. The bright pinkish-purplish color enticed me while walking through the meadow, but upon approaching they are unwelcoming due to the many spikes.

Flower 2: Red clover

Genus + species: Trifolium pretense

Family: Fabaceae red clover, Trifolium pretense- Fabaceae

This flower is zygomorphic and has two keel petals that are fused at the tip. However, there are a total of 5 petals, including 1 banner petal, 2 wings and 2 keel petals. There are 10 stamen total with 9 fused and 1 that is separate. There are a total of 5 sepals. The insertion of flower parts is hypogyous and the gynoecium type is unicarpellate. The inflorescence type is capitulum.

This plant was found on a highly disturbed mowed path within the wet meadow at Battelle-Darby Creek Metro Park Clover flowers are edible and “awefully good”- the very cute scene from bambi with the little rabbits where they talk about the flowers being sweet.

Flower 3: Great blue lobeila

Genus + species: Lobeila siphilitica

Family: Campanulaceae

This flower is zygomorphic and looks similar to the mint family that we are studying in class. There are a total of 5 fused petals with 3 on the bottom and 2 on top with 5 stamen. The flowers are a bright purplish color, which may be misleading due to the name. The insertion of flower parts is hypogynous, and the gynoecium type is syncarpous. The inflorescence type is raceme.

This flower was found in the understory of a mixed hardwood forest located along the floodplain of Battelle-Darby Creek Metro Park.

Flower 4: Lady’s thumb

Genus + Species: Polygonum persicaria

Family: Polygonaceae

This plant’s flower has radial symmetry with a total of 3 fused tepals and 6 stamen. The insertion of parts is hypogynous, and the gynoecium type is syncarpous. The inflorescence type is raceme with individual capitulum at the ends of each branch.

This plant was found at the edge of a mowed area within a wet meadow habitat within Battelle-Darby Creek Metro Park. The family polygonaceae comes from latin meaning ” many knees” due to the swollen nodes of the leaf stem. Lady’s thumb is related to rhubarb which is also in the polygonaceae (or smartweed/knotweed) family.

Source: https://www.wildflowers-and-weeds.com/Plant_Families/Polygonaceae.htm

Fruit 1: Sugar maple samara

Genus + species: Acer saccharum

Family: Aceraceae

Sugar maples can have both male and female flowers; although, some flowers with pistils do have some stames (sometimes). The flowers of sugar maple are radially symmetrical, contain 4 fused petals, have 6-8 stamen, and 5 sepals. The insertion of flower parts is epigynous, and the gynoecium type is syncarpous. The gynoecium forms two fused carpels that can break apart. The inflorescence type is umbel, yet it is drooping.

The fruits of this plant were found on the ground within a mixed hardwood forest in a floodplain of Battelle-Darby Creek Metro Park. Although there were also boxelder maple samaras (Acer negundo) surrounding, these samaras have a different form and are rounder at the ends where the seed is contained.

Fruit 2: Yellow buckeye capsule

Genus + species: Aesculus flava

Family: Hippocastanaceae

The flowers of this plant are radial with 4 fused tepals, and 8 stamen. The insertion of flower parts epigynous, and the gynoecium type is syncarpous. The fruit that forms due to these flowers typically contain 1-2 seeds within (I smacked this fruit off of the tree with a stick, so I am not sure where the other seed went or if there was one). The inflorescence type is panicle due to there being racemes on racemes. Eventhough our school uses the Ohio buckeye as a mascot, the yellow buckeye seed (not fruit) is very similar in appearance. Ohio buckeye fruits typically contain spikes on the outside.

The plant was found in a mixed hardwood forest on the floodplain of Battelle-Darby Creek Metro Park.

Fruit 3: Amur honeysuckle berry

Genus + species: Lonicera maackii

Family: Caprifoliaceae

The flowers that produce this berry are zygomorphic with 5 sepals, 5 fused petals, ad 5 stamen. The insertion of flower parts is epigynous, and the gynoecium type is syncarpous. The inflorescence type is a spike due to the flower pairing with a leaf along the branch.

The plant was found along the edge of a mixed hardwood forest along a path within Battelle-Darby Creek Metro Park. This plant does well in multiple types of habitats since it is a noxious shrub. The berries are a showy red color in the fall and provide almost no nutrients to the birds that consume them and spread them.

Source: http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/honeysuckle

Fruit 4: White false indigo legume

Genus + species: Bapista alba

Family: Fabaceae

This flower is zygomorphic with a total of 5 petals, including 1 banner petal, 2 wings and 2 keel petals. There are 10 stamen total with 9 fused and 1 that is separate. There are a total of 5 sepals. The insertion of flower parts is hypogyous and the gynoecium type is unicarpellate producing the single legume shown in the photo. The inflorescence type is raceme.

This plant was found in a wet meadow habitat within Battelle-Darby Creek Metro Park. This plant is fatal to cows and can be irritating to humans if ingested, so although they may look yummy, do not eat them.

Source: https://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=BAAL